Researchers Develop Paper Computer


August 6, 2011

Researchers Develop Paper Computer

Researchers at the Queens University Human Media Lab in Kingston, Ontario, have developed a prototype computer with a flexible, touch-screen display that is completely bendable.
“This computer looks, feels and operates like a small sheet of interactive paper,” declared creator Roel Vertegaal, director of the lab. “You interact with it by bending it into a cellphone, flipping the corner to turn pages or writing on it with a pen.”
Whatever the technology is called, the researchers said it could be used in tablets, phones and other devices that will “shape with your pocket.”
Flexible multitouch devices would offer a number of benefits; for example, they can be dropped and aggressively handled without the fear of cracked screens. Also, with flexible devices like a smartphone or e-reader, people could carry a large screen in their pockets without the bulky weight of a device made of glass or metal.
Described as a flexible cellphone the invention heralds a new generation of computers that are super lightweight, thin-film and flexible. they use no power when nobody is interacting with them. When users are reading, they don’t feel like they’re holding a sheet of glass or metal

“The paperless office is here. everything can be stored digitally and you can place these computers on top of each other just like a stack of paper, or throw them around the desk,” says Dr. Vertegaal,
The development team included researchers Byron Lahey and Win Burleson of the motivational environments research group at Arizona State University (ASU), Audrey Girouard and Aneesh Tarun from the human media lab at Queen’s University, Jann Kaminski and Nick Colaneri, director of Arizona State University’s flexible display center, and Seth Bishop and Michael McCreary, the V.P. r&d of e ink corporation.

Publisher: Salient News